Disclaimer

The articles excerpted on this site report on the state of the industry as seen by mainstream media, and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the officers of the ILWU Coast Longshore Division.

Bernie Sanders, Danny Glover: Union workers have it better

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders stood with thousands at a pro-union rally near Nissan Motor Co.’s plant in Canton, Mississippi, congratulating workers for their courage “in standing up for justice.”

“It’s our job to tell corporate America that they cannot have it all,” Sanders told the crowd. “Start treating the working people of this country with […]

FacebookEmailShare

Josh Williams: Local 10 Drill Team Founder

Rest in Peace, Captain Josh Williams

Josh Williams, the longtime ILWU member and pensioner who created and led Local 10’s famous Drill Team for 50 years, passed on June 3 at the age of 83.

Like many African-Americans of his generation, Williams’ family was based in the south. His father was a sharecropper and […]

FacebookEmailShare

‘There was one thing for which all the pain and sacrifice was justified: Union recognition’

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968

“With the settlement of many of these early strikes, there was little or nothing added to the pay envelope, little or nothing for job security and a mountain of debts to pay and harsh memories to forget. Yet there was one thing […]

FacebookEmailShare

Longshore Workers Thresh Grain Shipper, Block Train

The following is excerpted from a Labor Notes article written by Evan Rohar, a former casual in Tacoma:

As Dr. King wrote in his Letter from Birmingham Jail, “There are two types of laws: just and unjust. One has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.”

EGT started the fight by suing the Port […]

FacebookEmailShare

‘The labor movement turned misery and despair into hope and progress’

“At the turn of the century, women earned approximately ten cents an hour, and men were fortunate to receive twenty cents an hour. The average work week was sixty to seventy hours. During the thirties, wages were a secondary issue; to have a job at all was the difference between the agony […]

FacebookEmailShare